Has sexual harassment in the workplace increased?

Here’s my take on one of the most covered employment related news topics this year, and answers to some key questions.

With the amount of press coverage given to the behaviour of politicians, aid workers, business leaders, film producers, and large companies such as #Google and #Uber involved with allegations in the last year, you could be forgiven for thinking that #sexualharassment in the workplace has increased.

It probably hasn’t, but there is little doubt that there has been increased reporting as various campaigns (#MeToo, #TimesUp etc) have drawn attention to this issue.  Despite all this attention, only 30% of respondents to a recent ACAS Survey thought that sexual harassment had decreased in the last five years and only 24% thought that recent international media coverage had improved their workplace culture.

We appear to have an endemic problem which in the past has not been reported.  In their ‘Ending sexual harassment at work report’ (2018) the Equality and Human Rights Commission found that approximately 50% of respondents had not reported harassment due to fears of consequent victimisation and a feeling that senior management was ‘untouchable’.

OK, so that’s the big picture, but what are the everyday questions that key decision makers in businesses need to understand.

What is sexual harassment?

It’s a form of discrimination, and there is a statutory definition found in the Equality Act 2010.  ACAS summarises it like this:-

‘Unwanted conduct related to ‘sex’ (editor), which has the purpose or effect of violating an individual’s dignity or creating an intimidating, hostile, degrading, humiliating or offensive environment for that individual’.

The definition includes behaviour that might not be specifically aimed at one individual (for instance circulating offensive material of a sexual nature) and treating someone less favourably because they either accepted or rejected conduct of a sexual nature (someone gets overlooked for promotion because they rejected a sexual advance).

What is the difference between harassment and bullying?

People often claim these two things together.  There is a distinction, but it is quite a fine one!

Bullying is behaviour that has similar effects as harassment but is not on the basis of sex or any other characteristic that is protected by equality legislation.  It usually involves an abuse or misuse of power.

Bullying is not discrimination, but an aggrieved employee can resign and claim constructive dismissal, and if their health suffers, for instance because of persistent intimidation, they may well have a personal injury claim on the basis of the employer failing in their health and safety ‘duty of care’.

On the other hand, someone who suffers harassment can go to an Employment Tribunal and claim discrimination, for which compensation is uncapped.

Is it my responsibility to take action even if nobody is complaining?

Employees may be too scared to report this type of behaviour, but this does not mean you should ignore it if you know it is going on.

It will often be affecting performance, productivity, absence from work, and unnecessary staff turnover. It will be costing your business money, not to mention huge reputational risk.

The least you should do is investigate.

Do I need an anti-bullying and harassment policy?

If you have heard one of my #ceo briefings, you’ll know that I am not a great fan of solving things via a policy.  It rarely works.

Formal or informal (a quiet word) education and training and setting an example yourself, are likely to be more effective.

There is a big ‘however’ here though.

A policy (and the best will give examples so that employees understand the types of behaviours that are unacceptable) that is effectively reinforced may well prevent bullying and harassment, and if it doesn’t, it may still lead a Tribunal to conclude that an employer had taken reasonable steps to prevent these behaviours and thus not be liable.

If you are a small organisation without a policy, a Tribunal would take the size and resources of your organisation into account and is very unlikely to penalise you for not having one.

In summary, my advice would be if you have a staff handbook, then add a policy if you don’t already have one.  If you don’t have a staff handbook, don’t get one just for this reason.

Is telling someone what to do bullying or harassment?

Employees often claim bullying or harassment when they are told to do something they don’t like doing, or they are given critical feedback.

If you are asking someone to do something, and you would not ask someone of the opposite sex to do that, it may amount to harassment.  Similarly, if the manner you speak to someone is different because of their sex.

Ordinarily, just telling someone what to do or giving critical feedback is well within the expectations of an employment relationship, and I would make this clear in any policy with a statement such as:-

‘Legitimate, reasonable and constructive criticism of your performance or behaviour, or reasonable instructions given to you in the course of your employment, will not amount to bullying on their own’.

Stories of sexual misconduct have caused considerable political embarrassment this year, and it is a shame that it takes this to encourage further action, although whilst the Government is otherwise distracted (sorry Bob – Bored of Brexit – I had to mention it!) we may see nothing more than promises.

There has been talk of :-

  • creating a mandatory duty to prevent sexual harassment (which would presumably require an employer to do something about an incident even if the victim did not want it pursued),
  • a ‘code of practice’ similar to those we have for discipline or flexible working,
  • the reinstatement of protection against third party harassment (various surveys have estimated that 15 to 20% of sexual harassment has been perpetrated by customers or clients)
  • extending Employment Tribunal claim limits from 3 to 6 months for sexual harassment cases,
  • banning redundancy during pregnancy, maternity leave and for six months afterwards (in 2015 54,000 women lost their jobs as a result of pregnancy discrimination) as is already the case in Germany,
  • extending protection from sexual harassment to volunteers and interns, and
  • making ‘gagging’ clauses illegal in respect of sexual harassment.

The moral here is not to wait for legislation.

Take some of the steps outlined above.  Investigate concerns, set an example yourself, have a preventative quite word where necessary, and get and promote a policy (surprise, surprise, we can provide one if you want).

 

Ken Allison | 28 November 2018 | Paradigm Partners | www.paradigmpartners.co.uk

Ken Allison is an engaging trainer and speaker who manages to make his topics, on handling employment law related people issues and other HR stuff, highly interactive, challenging, entertaining, and above all, relevant to the 21st Century executive. Ken uses his understanding of managing businesses to show managers what they ‘can do’ rather than what they ‘cannot do’.

Through his firm’s ‘ExecutiveHR’ service, Ken also provides telephone based support services to businesses throughout the UK.

This blog is not a substitute for taking legal advice!

 

Bonuses: why pay ’em

Earlier this year Eric Daniels (the one-time CEO of the Lloyds Banking Group) successfully sued his ex-employer for an unpaid #bonus of £1.3 million worth of shares.  Litigation of this type outside the financial services sector is thankfully rare, but bonuses do often lead to disagreements, particularly when people leave.

I remain amazed how documentation is often drafted casually, if at all, and how bonus arrangements continue year after year with very little thought about their effectiveness.  If this rings bells for you – read on.

What are bonuses?

Bonuses have long been a part of the pay landscape, with very little evidence about their effectiveness as a motivator.

Wikipedia describes a bonus as ‘an extra payment for doing one’s job well’, and supporters will argue that they reinforce desired behaviours such as a focus on profitability or sales.

In reality, many bonuses are only loosely linked to individual performance, and critics will argue that unless there is a clear ‘line of sight’ between the objectives (levels of profitability, sales, effecting change etc.) and the contribution made by individuals, the prospect of a bonus will not influence behaviour in the job.

They are often little more than a deferred payment.

Detractors will also argue (following in a Maslow/Herzberg tradition) that it is the intrinsic value of the job that motivates, and quote numerous studies where reward comes well down the list of priorities as a motivator. For employees they can be unpredictable, often don’t count towards pay for the purposes of obtaining a mortgage, and they are usually non-pensionable.

On this latter point, care should now be taken to ensure that any bonus, regardless of what it says in the contract of employment, will be pensionable if the employee’s pension does not otherwise reach the upper earnings limit of £46,384 (2018/19). If you are offering a final salary pension scheme, you also need to check the scheme rules to ensure that they don’t require bonuses to be pensionable.

How popular are they?

The CIPD Reward Survey reveals a steady reduction in the number of employers using bonus schemes of one sort or another.  Overall 48% of employers used them (43% of SMEs) in 2017, although the decline is probably largely due to the capping of bonuses in the financial services since the 2008/9 crash.

The figures illustrated below show the decline and also that, outside of financial services (Rest of Economy), bonus payments make up about 5% of total pay compared to 20% in financial services (used with permission).

What are the different types of bonuses?

Very often bonuses are related to profitability or sales, meaning that they are only paid if the organisation can afford it, and managers can (within limits – see later comments) exercise some discretion over pay outs.

Typically, bonuses relate to individual, team or overall organisational performance (in the latter case usually profit) and can be ‘tiered’ to reflect different levels of achievement.  At one time there were tax incentives for schemes that paid all employees a bonus based on profitability, which was thought to encourage an overall focus on the purpose of the enterprise being to make a profit.

In Eric Daniel’s case some of the bonus apparently related to the successful integration of HBOS into the Lloyds Group – sometimes known as a ‘project bonus’.

Commission is a type of bonus usually contractually paid on a regular basis in relation to individual sales performance.

Bonuses are often paid in cash, but in the US, non-cash incentives such as a holiday for the top sales person, or retail vouchers play a prominent part in reward, and share options are often used for senior executives, such as in the Eric Daniels case.

What are the legal implications?

Despite the unlikelihood of litigation (outside of the financial sector), here are five tips for ensuring that things go smoothly.

1. Be clear about the the contractual/discretionary nature of the bonus.  Outside the financial services sector, contractual bonuses are rare, although they may sometimes be given when an employee joins you, and you guarantee a level of bonus for the first year.  The most common bonus arrangements reserve some level of discretion on behalf of the employer, either to award a bonus at all, or to award subject to agreed performance criteria.

2. Avoid acting in an inconsistent manner. Employee’s should be able to trust their employer, and tribunals/courts will be unsympathetic to random or perverse decision making regarding the payment of bonuses, even if discretion has been reserved in the contract.  Discretion is not unfettered.

Also, unless you reserve the right, you cannot withhold bonuses for other reasons such as the employee being subject to disciplinary action or because you cannot afford it.  In instances where substantial bonuses relate to financial performance, companies can reserve the right to clawback payments in the event of it needing to restate its accounts or discovering material wrong doing on the part of the employee.

3. Regularly review bonus schemes so that an employee can’t argue that a particular payment has become contractually binding.  Business priorities change over time, and bonuses should reflect changing priorities.  The best way to achieve this contractually is to give a right to participate in a discretionary scheme which the Board may vary from time to time.

4. Be clear about what happens on termination (the most frequent cause of arguments!).  Commonly, well drafted bonus provisions make it clear that there will be no right to a bonus if the individual has left or is under notice at the time the bonus is payable.  Note, the normal payment date may be different from the, for instance, end of the financial year to which it relates (sometimes referred to as the ‘due’ date).

There is an argument that if someone has earnt a bonus, they should be paid it, but this is a moral or motivational issue, rather than a legal one.

There is certainly the possibility of unintended consequences when it comes to this type of non-payment clause.  It can lead to ‘team moves’ where groups of employees leave together as soon as they have received their bonus, and to less effort and interest when someone is working their notice without needing to maintain performance levels previously motivated by the prospect of a bonus payment.

5. Make sure you are fair towards employees on long term leave.  This is a complex area, which some employers (although unusually) try to overcome by having an ‘active service’ clause which says that you have to be in service (i.e. not on maternity, parental, long term sick leave etc.) at the time the bonus is payable.  The law is not exactly decisive on these types of issues, but generally an employee should not have their bonus affected by being on sick leave (it could give rise to a disability discrimination claim), but it is broadly accepted that bonuses can be ‘pro rated’ for women on maternity leave (and probably men on Shared Parental Leave).  Unless you have stated it clearly in the contract, you should take advice about this.

6. Watch oral promises, they may be binding.  Whilst Tribunals accept that promises made under the influence of alcohol at the office Christmas party cannot be relied on, other promises where they are quantifiable and clearly intended to be binding will be enforceable.

You may not have the €400 million bonus pool exposure that Dresdner Kleinwort had when they were found to have orally promised that amount to employees in 2008, and then tried to rein in the promise by introducing a ‘material adverse change’ clause that had not existed before. In the SME sector agreements are often made orally, so take care.

If you currently operate a bonus system, you are unlikely to achieve much by removing it, but you might want to review it to ensure that it is fit for purpose.  You may conclude that it is merely a deferred payment, but you may also see opportunities to align it more effectively to the strategic goals of the company.

At the very least, you might want to ensure that bonus terms are clear and unambiguous.

Ken Allison | 03 October 2018 | Paradigm Partners | www.paradigmpartners.co.uk

Ken Allison is an engaging trainer and speaker who manages to make his topics, on handling employment law related people issues and other HR stuff, highly interactive, challenging, entertaining, and above all, relevant to the 21st Century executive. Ken uses his understanding of managing businesses to show managers what they ‘can do’ rather than what they ‘cannot do’.

Through his firm’s ‘ExecutiveHR’ service, Ken also provides telephone-based support services to businesses throughout the UK.

This blog is not a substitute for taking legal advice!

 

If you know all about #GDPR, you probably don’t need to read this article!

Like me, you have probably been plagued over the last six months with offers of reports, consultancy services, webinars and conferences about the apocalyptic effects of GDPR (General Data Protection Regulations) and the prospect of €20 million fines.

I’m no expert on this (that’s a disclaimer!), but the truth is, there is nobody who knows all the answers yet, if they ever will.

There are still differing opinions about the impact of these regulations which stem from the EU and will be implemented (by 25 May 2018) into UK law when the Data Protection Bill finally passes through parliament.

The purpose of this blog is to set out the essentials that need to be carried out in a typical SME organisation (large organisations are probably well on with all this) in regard to the use of employee data.  The same principles will apply to other personal data, for instance on customers or clients, about which you may need more specialist advice.

There is lots of ground I won’t cover, but if you want an overview, this is my favourite from the European Commission, and if you want more detail, perhaps you are an HR professional responsible for this stuff, try this 35 minute webinar.

The underlying message is that data protection needs to become proactive, and to help you do this, here are three ‘musts’ and two ‘shoulds’:-

  1. A ‘privacy statement’ ‘must’ be given to employees whenever you collect data.

    At the moment you probably rely on a data processing statement in your contract of employment. This will not be sufficient under the GDPR which requires you to tell data subjects about the lawful basis for using the data (with employee data this is usually for compliance, performance of a contract or because of your legitimate business interests – which you must outline), your retention policy, and their rights in relation to their personal data. etc.

    You can provide this notice via your website, intranet or Staff Handbook, but as many organisations already do with Health and Safety, it is advisable to make specific reference to it when collecting personal data and obtain evidence that it has been read.

    You may also want a shorter version for use when recruiting.

  2. Responding appropriately. You ‘must’ keep a record of any personal data protection breach, including its effects and remedial action you have taken.  Even the loss of a mobile phone or laptop could amount to a breach.

    It may need recording.  It will need reporting to the Information Commissioner within 72 hours if it’s likely to cause a risk to the rights and freedoms of individuals, and where the risk is regarded as ‘high’, individuals must be told.

    You must also respond appropriately to subject access requests (SARs), the right to be forgotten, and requests for corrections or restrictions etc.

  3. You ‘must’ make sure you have adequate contracts with third party data processors (pay bureau and recruitment consultants being two of the most common). You will want assurances that they only process data you provide to them on written instructions, that staff involved with your data are subject to confidentiality agreements, and that they have adequate technical arrangements to ensure compliance.

    Sample contract clauses have been promised by the Information Commissioner’s Office (ICO).

  4. Underlying much of the GDPR, is a new data protection principle of ‘Accountability’. Can you demonstrate that you take appropriate steps to protect the personal data of employees and comply with the requirements of the regulations.

    You are going to have difficulty demonstrating this if you have don’t even know what personal data you use.  You ‘should’ carry out a personal data audit to help you demonstrate compliance.

    You will probably want to record what, where it comes from, who handles it, where it is stored, and two technical points, what is the lawful basis for using each item and how long do you keep it (retention).

    An audit is not compulsory, but without it you’ll have trouble doing some of the other things you have to do.  A couple of sides of A4 may well do this for many SMEs, and it should enable you to identify risks which can be mitigated.

  5. You ‘should’ appoint a responsible person (it might be you!) or know where you can go for advice when you need it. If your core business involves data processing, or you are involved in large scale processing of the special categories of data, then you must appoint a Data Protection Officer.

    If this is not the case, you may find it useful to have one person responsible for data protection issues, with a key role to educate and train other staff, but this will not be a requirement for many small businesses.

Is that all there is to it?  No, but an audit, a well drafted privacy statement, and regular Board level reviews and staff training/communication are likely to ensure that most SMEs who are only processing employee personal data will be able to show compliance with the 6 + 1 (Accountability) GDPR data processing principles.

Yes, there is much more including how you deal with transferring data outside the EU, responding to records of criminal convictions, automated decision making, personal data relating to children etc.  These are unlikely to be issues for most small businesses, so complex policies and procedures are probably not necessary.

If you want to sort all this out yourself, there is a self-assessment tool available on the Information Commissioner’s website, although as you might expect, it’s stronger on questions than it is on answers.

You may have also noticed (!) that there are plenty of consultants like ourselves, ready to assist.

Finally, what about those €20 million fines we mentioned at the beginning, and nearly every other communication about the GDPR has headlined?  There have been very few data protection convictions to date, and the evidence is that the ICO is not seeking to be over zealous in the future either.

So, this is not an issue to be driven by the prospect of fines or criminal convictions.  Its far more positive to see it as an opportunity to review systems and assure yourself that the data you are collecting is necessary.

We live in an age where people are becoming increasingly conscious about the security of their personal data and taking these matters seriously will increase employee confidence and enhance your employee brand.

 

Ken Allison | 05 March 2018 | Paradigm Partners | www.paradigmpartners.co.uk

Ken Allison is an engaging trainer and speaker who manages to make his topics, on handling employment law related people issues and other HR stuff, highly interactive, challenging, entertaining, and above all, relevant to the 21st Century executive. Ken uses his understanding of managing businesses to show managers what they ‘can do’ rather than what they ‘cannot do’.

Through his firm’s ‘ExecutiveHR’ service, Ken also provides telephone based support services to businesses throughout the UK.

This blog is not a substitute for taking legal advice!